[responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to Post"]

年中無休の家庭教師 毎日学習会

慶應義塾大学SFC 総合政策学部 英語 2005年 大問一 本文対訳

本文
■第1段落
1:1 If we look at the languages spoken in the world today, we notice wide differences in
the use to which they are put.
1:1今日世界で話されている言語をみてみれば、それらの使われ方に大きな違い
があるのに気づく。
1:2 Most languages are the first language of some community and serve the everyday
functions of that community perfectly well.
1:2 ほとんどの言語が、ある社会の第一言語であり、その社会で日常的な機能
を完璧に果たしている。
1:3 On the other hand, some languages have wider functions than that of everyday
communication and are used as official languages in the administration of whole
nations.
1:3他方、日常的な意思伝達以上の幅広い機能を果たし、国全体の行政におい
て公用語として使われているものもある。
1:4 Yet other languages enjoy an international role.
1:4国際的な役割をもっている言語さえある。
1:5 English, for instance, is the language of international air traffic, business
communication, and scientific publication, and is the lingua franca of tourism.
1:5 たとえば、英語は国際航空交通や、商業通信、科学出版物の用語であり、
観光の国際共通語である。
1:6 [1](1. Fortunately 2. Unfortunately 3. Hopefully), the differences in the roles that
languages play frequently lead some people to believe that some languages which do
not fulfill a wide range of functions are in fact incapable of doing so.
1:6不運にも、言語が果たす役割の違いのため、広汎な機能を果たしていない言
語のいくつかには、実際それをできる能力がないのだと信じてしまう人々もい
る。
1:7 In the view of some people, some languages are just not good enough.
1:7 まったく不十分な言語もあるという見方をする人もいる。
■第2段落
2:1 This sort of opinion is often seen in societies where a minority language is spoken
alongside a major language.
2:1 この種の意見はしばしば、主要言語と並んで少数言語が話されている社会に
みられる。
2:2 Consider the situation of Maori, the [2] (1. indigenous 2. Inevitable 3. Institutional)
language of New Zealand.
2:2 ニュージーランドの現地語、マオリ語の状況を考えてみよう。
2:3 Linguists estimate that English is the native language of some 95 percent of the New
Zealand population and the only language of about 90 percent.
2:3言語学者は、英語がニュージーランドの人口の約95%の母国語であり、約
90%の人々にとって唯一の言語であると見積もっている。

2:4 People who identify themselves as Maori [3] (1. come out 2. make up 3. sum up)
about 12 percent of the New Zealand population of just over 3 million.
2:4自分をマオリ人だとみなす人々は、300万をわずかに越えるニュージーラン
ドの人口の約12%を占める。
2:5 Although the Maori language is regarded as an important part of identity as a Maori,
it is spoken fluently by only 30,000 people.
2:5 マオリ語はマオリ人の独自性の重要部分であるとみなされているとはいえ、
それを流陽に話すのは、ほんの3万人に過ぎない。
■第3段落
3:1 Over the last twenty years, there have been a number of initiatives in the areas of
politics, education and broadcasting to try to use Maori and, [4] (1. by the way 2. in
addition 3. as a result), it is now an official language of New Zealand.
3:1過去20年にわたって、政治、教育、放送の分野でマオリ語を使おうという
発案が何度もなされてきたのであり、その結果、マオリ語はニュージーランド
の公用語になっている。
3:2 As these initiatives have progressed, however, some people have begun to express
the view that Maori is simply not capable of being used as an official language.
3:2 しかし、このような発案が進展するにつれて、マオリ語は公用語として使う
ことはまったくできないという見解を表明する人が出始めた。
3:3 This kind of opinion, in fact, is not based on logic.
3:3実は、この種の意見は、論理的な根拠がない。
3:4 I recall a comment in a New Zealand newspaper, which tried to [5] (1. make 2. see
3. show) the point that Maori was no good as a language because it had to borrow words
from English in order to express new ideas.
3:4私はニュージーランドの新聞に載った意見を覚えている。その意見は、マオ
リ語は新たな概念を表現するのに、英語から言葉を借り入れなければならない
から、言語として不十分であると主張しようとしていた。
3:5 English, [6] (1. on the one hand 2. on the other hand 3. On top of that), was a very
flexible and vital language because it had throughout its history been able to draw
resources from many other languages to express new ideas.
3:5一方、英語は歴史を通じて、新概念を表現するために、他の多くの言語か
ら糧を得てきたがゆえに、きわめて柔軟で生き生きした言語であるというのだ。
■第4段落
4:1 Now let’s look at the ways in which languages are supposed to be inadequate.
4:1 では、どのようにして言語が不十分であると考えられるのかをみてみよう。
4:2 In some instances, it is features of the structure of a language which are picked on as
the reason why another language is to be [7] (1. preferred 2. provoked 3. supported) for
a particular function.
4:2 いくつかの事例では、言語の構造の特徴こそが、別の言語が特定の機能を
果たすには好ましい理由として選ばれる。

4:3 In Switzerland, some people speak Romansh, a language descended from Latin,
although German has been making inroads for centuries.
4:3 スイスでは、ドイツ語が何世紀間も侵食し続けてきたにもかかわらず、ラテ
ン語に由来するロマンシュ語を話す人々がいる。
4:4 [8] (1. As for 2. As with 3. As regards) Maori, there has been a [9] (1. play 2. push 3.
pick) in recent decades to increase the areas of life and activity in which Romansh is
used.
4:4 マオリ語と同様に、最近数十年間にロマンシユ語を使う生活や活動の場を
増やそうと推進されてきた。
4:5 Now, German is a language which can very easily combine words into
‘compounds’.
4:5 ところで、ドイツ語は単語を結合して「複合語」にすることがきわめてたや
すくできる言語である。
4:6 Romansh is a language which cannot do this so readily and [10] (1. instead 2.
furthermore. additionally) uses phrases as a way of combining ideas.
4:6 ロマンシュ語は、そうたやすくはできないので、代わりに句を用いて概念を
結合する言語である。
4:7 Some speakers of Romansh believe that Romansh is not good enough to be used in
really technical areas of life because ‘German is able to construct clearly defined single
words for technical ideas, Romansh is not’.
4:7 「ドイツ語は専門的な概念を表すはっきり定義された単一語を作ることが
できるが、ロマンシュ語はできない」からロマンシュ語は生活の真に専門的な
領域で使うには不十分であると信じているロマンシュ語の話者もいる。
4:8 This notion ignores the fact that other languages such as French and Italian are in
exactly the same boat as Romansh, yet obviously have no problem in being precise in
technical areas.
4:8 この考え方は他のフランス語やイタリア語のような言語もロマンシュ語と
まったく同じ苦境にありながら専門領域における精密さに何の問題もないこと
を無視している。
■第5段落
5:1 Another reason given for the view that a language is not good enough is rather more
serious;
5:1 ある言語が不十分であるという見解を支持するために示されるもう1つの理
由は、かなり重大である。
5:2 it is the argument that ‘X is not good enough because you can’t discuss nuclear
physics in it.’
5:2 それは、「Xという言語では核物理学を議論できないから不十分なのだ」
という議論である。
5:3 The [11] (1. objection 2. inclination 3. implication) is that English is a better
language than X because there are topics you can discuss in one but not in the other.

5:3 それはつまり、X語より英語が勝っているのは、一方では議論できるが、他
方では議論できない話題があるからだということだろう。
5:4 At first glance this seems a very [12] (1. saying 2. speaking 3. telling) argument.
5:4一見したところでは、これはかなり説得力のある議論である。
■第6段落
6:1 However, this view confuses a feature of languages which is due just to their history
with an [13] (1. insistent 2. inherent 3. initial) property of languages.
6:1 しかし、この見解はその言語の歴史だけに起因する特徴と、その言語に固
有の特徴とを混同している。
6:2 That is, this opinion concludes that because there has been no occasion or need to
discuss, for arguments sake, nuclear physics in Maori; it could never be done because of
some inherent fault in Maori.
6:2 すなわち、議論を進めるためにいうと、この意見は、マオリ語で核物理学
を論じる機会や必要がこれまでなかったからだと結論づけ、マオリ語に固有の
欠陥のせいでそれを決して議論することができないとするのである。
6:3 A little thought, however, will show that this argument cannot be maintained.
6:3 しかし、少し考えてみれば、この議論が支持できないとわかるだろう。
6:4 Computers were not discussed in Old English;
6:4古英語でコンピュータは論じられなかった。
6:5 Modern English is the same language as Old English, only later;
6:5近代英語は古英語と同じものであって、時期が新しいというに過ぎない。
6:6 it should follow that Modern English cannot be used to discuss computers.
6:6 だから、近代英語はコンピュータを論じるのに使うことはできないという
ことになるはずである。
6:7 This is clearly [14] (1. assertive 2. absurd 3.appropriate).
6:7 これは明らかにばかげている。
6:8 What of course has happened is that through time English has developed the
resources necessary to the discussion of computers and very many other topics which
were simply unknown in earlier times.
6:8 もちろん実際には英語はずっとコンピュータやその他、昔はまったく知られ
ていなかったきわめて多くの話題の議論に不可欠な資源を開発してきたのだ。
6:9 And ‘developed’ is the crucial word in this matter.
6:9 また、「開発した」というのはこの問題では大変重要な言葉である。
6:10 English expanded its vocabulary in a variety of ways so as to meet the new [15]
(1.demands 2. supply 3. necessity) being made of it.
6:10英語は発展により生じている新たな需要を満たすために様々な方法でその
語いを拡大してきた。
6:11 All languages are capable of the same types of expansion of vocabulary to deal
with whatever new areas of life their speakers need to talk about.

6:11 すべての言語は同じように語いを拡大して、話し手が話題にする必要があ
る新しい生活領域がどのようなものであれ、それに対処することができるので
ある。
■第7段落
7:1 If one looks at the words which are used in English to handle technical subjects, one
sees that in fact the vast majority of these words have actually come from other
languages.
7:1英語で専門的な問題に対処するのに使われている言葉をみれば、実はこうし
た言葉の大多数が実際は他の言語に由来するのがわかる。
7:2 This process is usually called ‘borrowing’, though there is no thought that the words
will be given back somehow!
7:2 この方法は一般に「借用」と呼ばれる。もっとも、その語がどうにかして
返却されるとは、とても思えないけれど。
7:3 All languages do this to some extent, though English is perhaps the language which
has the highest level of ‘borrowed’ vocabulary, at least among the world’s major
languages.
7:3 すべての言語はある程度、こうした借用を行う。といっても英語という言語
の「借用」語いは、少なくとも世界の主要言語のうちで、おそらく最高レベル
だろう。
■第8段落
8:1 However, this is by [16] (1. all 2. some 3. no) means the only way in which a
language can develop its vocabulary;
8:1 しかしながら、これは決して言語がその語いを拡大する唯一の手段ではな
いのである。
8:2 there are many cases where the vocabulary of a language is developed from within,
that is, by using its own existing resources.
8:2言語の語いが「内部から」、すなわち、自分自身の現存資源を利用するこ
とによって発達する数多くの事例がある。
8:3 One of the reasons why a languages own resources may be used in the expansion of
its vocabulary is that a writer wants his/her work to be readily understood by its
intended audience, who might be [17](1. put on 2. put off 3. pulled off) by too much
borrowing.
8:3言語自身の資源がその語い拡大に利用される理由の1つは、作家が自分の作
品を、対象とする読み手にたやすく理解してもらいたいと思うからであり、読
み手は借用が多すぎれば、嫌気がさしてしまうかもしれない。
8:4 This is what Cicero* did.
8:4 こうしたことを、キケロがやってのけたのだった。
8:5 In order to write in Latin about the ideas of Greek philosophy, he developed a Latin
vocabulary which corresponded to the ideas he wanted to put [18(] 1. away 2. down 3.
across).

8:5 ラテン語でギリシャ哲学の思想のことを書くために、彼は自分が理解しても
らいたかった思想に対応するラテン語の語いを生み出したのだった。
8:6 An example of this was his use of the Latin word ratio to mean ‘reason’, a usage
which has come down to us today in English.
8:6 この一例として、彼はラテン語のratioという語を「理性」を意味するよう
に用いたのであり、その用法は今日まで英語に受け継がれている。
8:7 He also invented new words made up of Latin elements:
8:7 また彼は、ラテン語の要素からなる新語も造った。
8:8 for instance, the word qualitas, which became ‘quality’ in English, was [19] (1.
coined 2. depicted 3. designated) by Cicero to correspond to a Greek idea.
8:8 たとえば、qualitasという、英語ではqualityとなった語は、ギリシャの念に
対応するようにキケロによって造語されたのだった。
8:9 Thus, he composed his philosophical works in Latin partly to make Greek
philosophy available to a Latin-speaking audience, but also partly to show that it could
be done.
8:9 こうして、彼がラテン語で自分の哲学の著作を書いたのは、1つにはラテン
語の話し手である読者がギリシャ哲学を理解できるようにするためであったが、
また1つには、それができるということを示すためだった。
8:10 This was because some of his contemporaries were skeptical about the possibility
of Latin being able to express the ideas of the Greeks!
8:10 それは、彼の同時代人にはギリシャの思想をラテン語が表現できる可能性
に懐疑的だった人がいたからだったのだ。
■第9段落
9:1 Minority languages, like Maori and Romansh, are today doing very much the same
thing as Cicero did for Latin, constructing vocabulary out of existing resources within
the languages, precisely so that they can be used to talk about areas like computers, law,
science, and so on, for which they have not been used so much in the past.
9:1 マオリ語やロマンシュ語のような少数言語は、今日、キケロがラテン語にし
たのとほぼ同じことを行って、言語内部にある現存資源から語いを作り上げて、
まさにコンピュータや法律、科学などといった領域のことを語るのに使えるよ
うにしようとしているが、それらの言語は過去には、そうしたことにはあまり
使われたことがなかったのである。
9:2 These two languages are [20] (1. likely 2. unlikely 3. inclined) ever to become
international languages of science or diplomacy, but if history had been different, they
could have, and then we might have been wondering whether perhaps English was ‘just
not good enough’.
9:2 この2言語がいつか、科学や外交の国際語になることは、ありそうもないけ
れども、もしも歴史が違っていたならばそうなっていたかもしれないのであり、
そうだったとしたら、私たちは、ひょっとすると英語では「まったく不十分」
なのではないかしらと思ったかもしれない。

Cicero: a Roman orator, politician and philosopher of the first century BC

copyright 2016/Everyday school