[responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to Post"]

年中無休の家庭教師 毎日学習会

慶應義塾大学SFC 総合政策学部 英語 2007年 大問一 本文対訳

本文
■第1段落
1:1 There are many meanings of the word “theory.”
1:1 「理論」という言葉には、多くの意味がある。
1:2 In science, a theory states a relationship between two or more things (scientists
call them “variables”) that can be tested by factual observations.
1:2科学では理論は、事実を観察することによって検証することができる2つ以
上のもの(科学者は「変数」と呼ぶ)の間の関係を表す。
1:3 We have a “theory of gravity” that [1] (1. examines 2. predicts 3. acknowledges) the
speed at which an object falls, the path on which a satellite must travel if it is to
maintain a constant distance from the earth, and the position that a moon will keep with
respect to its associated planet.
1:3私たちは、物体が落下する速度や、衛星が地球から一定距離を維持するのに
通過せねばならない軌跡や、月が自分の連結している惑星との関係で保つ位置
を予測する「重力理論」をもっている。
■第2段落
2:1 This theory has been tested rigorously, [2] (1. as much as 2. so much as 3. so much
so) that we can now launch a satellite and know exactly where it must be in space in
order to keep it rotating around the earth.
2:1 この理論は厳密に検証されてきたのであり、その厳密さのために私たちは、
今衛星を打ち上げ、それが地球の周りを回り続けるようにするためには、宇宙
のどこに置かなければならないのかが正確にわかるほどである。
2:2 It was not always this way.
2:2 つねにそうだったというわけではない。
2:3 From classical times to the Middle Ages, many important thinkers thought that the
speed with which objects fall toward the earth depended solely on their weight.
2:3古典時代から中世まで、多くの重要な思想家たちは、物体が地面に向かって
落ちる速度は、ただその重量によって決まると考えていたのである。
2:4 We now know that this view is false.
2:4私たちは今、この見解が誤りであることを知っている。
2:5 In a vacuum, objects fall at the same speed and, thanks to Newton, we know the
formula with which to [3] (1.accelerate 2.calculate 3. control) that speed.
2:5真空中では、物体は同一速度で落下するし、またニュートンのおかげで、私
たちは、その速度を計算するための公式を知っているのである。
■第3段落
3:1 The other meaning of “theory” is the popular and not the scientific one.
3:1 「理論」のもう一つの意味は、大衆的なものであって、科学的なものではな
い。
3:2 It is referred to as a guess, a faith, or an idea.
3:2 それは当てずっぽうとか、信仰、思いつきなどと言われている。
3:3 It does not state L [4] (1. an adaptable 2. a testable. a usable) relationship between
two or more things.
3:3 それは2つ以上のものの間の検証可能な関係を表しはしない。
3:4 It is a belief that may be true, but its truth cannot be tested by scientific inquiry.
3:4 それは、正しいかもしれない信念であるが、しかし、その正しさは科学的
な探求によって検証することはできない。
3:5 One such theory is that God exists and [5] (1.includes 2. infers 3. intervenes) in
human life in ways that affect its outcome.
3:5 そうした理論の一つに、神は存在し、人間の暮らしに干渉しその結果に影
響するのだ、とするものがある。
3:6 God may well exist, and He may well help people overcome problems or even (if
we believe certain athletes) determine the outcome of a game.
3:6神は存在することもあろうし、人間が問題を克服するのに手を貸したり、
さらには(あるスポーツ選手の言うことを信じるなら)試合の結果を決定するこ
ともあろう。
3:7 But that theory cannot be verified.
3:7 しかし、そうした理論を証明することはできない。
3:8 There is no way anyone has found that we can prove empirically that God exists or
that His action has affected some human life.
3:8神が実在するとか、神の行為が人間の暮らしに影響したとかいうことを経
験的に証明する方法が見つかったことはかつてない。
3:9 If such a test could be found, the scientist who performed it would overnight
become a [6]( 1. Genius 2. hero 3. Successor).
3:9 もしそうした検証方法が見つかれば、それを成し遂げた科学者は、一夜に
して英雄となることだろう。
■第4段落
4:1 Evolution is a theory in the scientific sense.
4:1進化は科学的な意味での理論である。
4:2 It has been tested repeatedly by examining the remains of now-extinct creatures to
see how one [7] (1. sequence 2. Organization 3. Species) has emerged to replace
another.
4:2今は絶滅した生物の遺骸を検査して、どのように一つの種が出現しては、別
の種に取って代わったのかを知ることによって、それはくり返し検証されてき
た。
4:3 Even today we can see some examples of evolution at work, such as when scholars
watch how birds on the Galapagos Islands adapt their beak size from generation to
generation to the food supplies they encounter.
4:3今日でさえ、進化が作用していることを示す実例をいくつか目にすることが
できる。たとえばガラパゴス諸島の鳥たちが、世代ごとに、そのくちばしの大
きさを接触する食物資源にあわせて適応させる様を、学者は目にしたりする。
■第5段落
5:1 The theory of evolution has not been proven as fully as the theory of gravity.
5:1進化論は、重力理論ほどには十分に証明されていない。
5:2 There are many gaps in what we know about prehistoric creatures.
5:2先史時代の生物に関して私たちの知っていることには、数多くの断絶がある。
5:3 But everything that we have learned is [8](1.consistent] with 2. Contrary to 3.
irrelevant to) the view that the creatures we encounter today had ancestors from which
they evolved.
5:3 しかし私たちが学んだことはすべて、今日私たちが出会う生物には進化の
元となった祖先があったという見解に合致する。
5:4 This view, which is the only scientifically defensible theory of the origin of species,
does not by any [9] (1.means 2. trend 3.accident) rule out the idea that God exists.
5:4 この見解は、種の起源に関する科学的に擁護可能な唯一の理論であるが、
神が存在するという思想を排斥するものでは決してないのである。
■第6段落
6:1 What existed before the Big Bang created the universe?
6:1 ビッグバンが宇宙を創造する以前に、何が存在していたのか。
6:2 Is there an afterlife of heaven (or hell) that awaits us after we die?
6:2天国(あるいは地獄)という、死後私たちを待ち受ける来世はあるのか。
6:3 Can a faith in God change our lives?
6:3神への信仰は私たちの暮らしを変えられるのか。
6:4 There are religious scientists who believe that God exists and affects our lives, and
there are scientists who reject the idea of God and his actions.
6:4神は存在するし、私たちの暮らしに影響すると信じる宗教的な科学者たち
もいるし、神とその行為という思想を否認する科学者もいる。
6:5 For example, Isaac Newton was a deeply religious man, and what we today call the
Newtonian laws, he [10] (1. attached 2. attributed 3. contributed) to Gods handiwork.
6:5 たとえば、アイザック=ニュートンは信心深い人間であったし、今日私たち
がニュートンの法則と呼ぶものを彼は神の御業によるものだと考えていたので
ある。
6:6 On the other hand, Charles Darwin, though he started his adult life as a sincere
believer intending to become a priest, abandoned his insistence that God created animal
species and replaced that view with his extraordinary, and now widely accepted, theory
of evolution.
6:6他方、チャールズ=ダーウインは、青年期の初めには、聖職者になろうとし
ていた敬度s誉顰____Fな信者であったが神が動物を作ったのだとする説を捨て、その見解
を自分のとんでもない、だが今は広く受け容れられている、進化論に置き換え
たのだった。
■第7段落
7:1 There is another theory called “intelligent design.”
7:1 もう一つ、「知的設計」と呼ばれる理論もある。
7:2 Its [11] (1. Consumers 2. Critics 3. Proponents) argue that there are some things in
the natural world that are so complex that they could not have been created by accident.
7:2 その提唱者たちは、自然界にはあまりにも複雑なので偶然によって作られた
のではありえないものがあると論じる。
7:3 They often use the mousetrap as a metaphor.
7:3彼らはしばしば、ねずみ取りを比喩として使う。
7:4 We can have all of the parts of a trap – a board, a spring, a clamp – but it will not be
a mousetrap unless someone assembles it.
7:4私たちに板、バネ、留め金といった罠のすべての部品があっても、誰かがそ
れを組み立てない限り、それはねずみ取りにはならないだろう。
7:5 The assembler is the “intelligent designer.”
7:5 その組立人が「知的設計者」なのである。
■第8段落
8:1 Mousetraps, however, are not created by nature but are manufactured by people.
8:1 しかし、ねずみ取りは自然によって作られたのではなく、人間によって製造
されたのである。
8:2 Then, we must ask what part of natural life is so complex that it cannot be fully
explained by Darwinian Theory.
8:2 だから私たちは、ダーウイン理論では十分に説明できないほど複雑なのは自
然生物のどの部分なのかと尋ねなければならない。
8:3 Some have suggested that the human eye is one such example.
8:3人間の目がその一例であると言った人もいる。
8:4 But the eye has been studied for decades with results that strongly [12] (1. deny 2.
doubt 3. suggest) it has evolved.
8:4 しかし、目は数十年も研究され、進化したのだということを強く示す結果
が出ている。
8:5 At first there were light sensitive plates in prehistoric creatures that enabled them to
move toward and away from illumination.
8:5最初、先史時代の生物には、光に敏感な板があり、それによって彼らは光源
に近づいたり遠ざかったりできたのである。
8:6 In a few animals, these light sensitive plates were more precise.
8:6 こうした光に敏感な板が、ある少数の生物においては、より精密になって
いったのだ。
8:7 This was the result of genetic differences.
8:7 これは遺伝的な差異の結果である。
8:8 Just as only a few people today can see a baseball [13] (1. as long as 2. as poorly as
3. as well as) Ted Williams could, so then some creatures were able not only to detect
light but to see shapes or colors in the light.
8:8 テッド=ウイリアムズと同じくらい野球の球が見える人が、今日ほんのわず
かながらいるのとちょうど同じように、当時光を探り当てるだけでなく、光の
中で形態や色を見ることができる生物もいたのである。
■第9段落
9:1 When those talented creatures lived in a world that rewarded such precision, they
[14] (1. recovered 2. regained 3. reproduced) while untalented creatures died out.
9:1 そうした才能を持った生物が、その精密さの報われる暮らしをしていた時、
彼らが繁殖する一方で才能に恵まれない生物は死に絶えた。
9:2 Maybe the talented ones were better able to find food or avoid being eaten and the
untalented ones could not.
9:2 ことによると、才能のある方は食物を見つけたり、食べられるのを避けた
りすることに長けていて、才能に恵まれない方は、それができなかったのかも
しれない。
9:3 These first genetic accidents were followed, over millions of years, by others that
made it possible for some creatures to see very tiny objects or see at great distances.
9:3 こうした最初の遺伝的な偶然の後に、数百万年にわたって別の偶然が続き、
ある生物は、きわめて小さいものが見えたり、きわめて遠く離れたものが見え
たりするようになった。
9:4 Such creatures had an evolutionary [15] (1. advantage 2. preference 3. priority) over
other creatures that could not do those things.
9:4 それらの生物は、こうしたことができない生物よりも進化上有利であった。
■第10段落
10:1 But if an intelligent designer indeed created the human eye, that designer made
some big mistakes.
10:1 しかし、もし知的設計者が人間の目を作ったのだとすれば、その設計者は
ある大きな誤りを犯した。
10:2 The eye has a blind spot in the middle that [16] (1. enhances 2. induces 3. reduces)
its capacity to see.
10:2目には中心に盲点があって、その見る力を損なっているのである。
10:3 Other creatures, more dependent on sharp eyesight than we are, do not have this
blind spot.
10:3私たち以上に鋭い視力に依存する生物には、このような盲点のないものも
いる。
10:4 Some people are colorblind and others must start wearing glasses when they are
small children.
10:4人間には色覚異常の人がいるし、幼児のうちからメガネを必要とする人も
いる。
10:5 All of these variations and shortcomings are consistent with evolution.
10:5 こうした変異や欠点すべてが進化に合致しているのである。
10:6 None is consistent with the view that the eye was designed by an intelligent being.
10:6 どれ一つとして、知的存在によって目が設計されたとする見解に合致する
ものはないのである。
■第11段落
11:1 What schools should do is to teach evolution emphasizing both its successes and
it’s still unexplained limitations.
11:1学校がすべきことは、その成功と依然として説明のつかない限界の両方に
力点を置きながら進化を教えることである。
11:2 Evolution, like almost every scientific theory, has some problems.
11:2進化には、ほとんどすべての科学的な理論と同様に、問題もある。
11:3 But they are not the kinds of problems that can be solved by assuming that an
intelligent designer created life.
11:3 しかしそれらは、知的設計者が生命を創造したと想定することで解決でき
るようなものではない。
11:4 Not a single [17] (1. piece 2. proportion 3. property) of scientific evidence in
support of this theory has been put forth since the critics of Darwin began writing in the
19th century.
11:4 この理論を支持する科学的な証拠はダーウィンの批判者たちが19世紀に書
き始めて以来、ただ一つとして提出されたことはないのである。
■第12段落
12:1 Some people claim that if evolution is a useful (and, so far, correct) theory, we
should still see it at work all around us in humans.
12:1 もし進化が有益な(そして、これまでのところ、正しい)理論であるなら、
それは依然として、私たちの周りすべて、人間の中にも作用しているのが見え
るはずだと主張する人もいる。
12:2 We do not.
12:2見えないではないかと。
12:3 But we can see it if we adopt a long enough time frame.
12:3 しかし十分に長い時間的枠組みを採用すればそれが見えるのである。
12:4 Mankind is believed to have been on this earth for about 100,000 years.
12:4人類は地上に現れてから約10万年経っていると信じられている。
12:5 In that time there have been changes in people’s appearance, but those changes
have occurred very slowly.
12:5 それだけの時間に人間の外観には変化があったがそうした変化は極めて
ゆっくり生じた。
12:6 After all, 1,000 centuries is just a [18] (1. blank 2. blink 3. block) in geological
time.
12:6 なにしろ1000世紀など、地質学的な時間ではほんの一瞬なのだから。
12:7 [19] (1. Besides 2.Therefore 3. However), the modern world has created an
environment by means of public health measures, the reduction in crime rates, and
improved levels of diet that have sharply reduced the environmental variation that is
necessary to [20] (1. reconstruct 2. renew 3. reward) some genetic accidents and
penalize others.
12:7 その上、現代世界が生み出した環境では公衆衛生施策や、犯罪率減少食糧
水準の向上によって、遺伝的偶然のうちあるものを優遇し、他のものには不利
益を課すためには不可欠な環境的な変化が著しく減少してしまった。
12:8 But 100,000 years from now, will the environment change so much that people
who now have unusual characteristics will become the dominant group in society?
12:8 しかし、今後10万年で環境が大きく変化して、今は一般的でない特徴をも
つ人々が社会の主流となるのだろうか。
12:9 Maybe.
12:9 さてどうだろう。

copyright 2016/Everyday school